Last updated on 4 March 2018

SUMMARY

Summary

IDENTIFICATION

SCIENTIFIC NAME(s)

Ocyurus chrysurus

SPECIES NAME(s)

Yellowtail snapper, Gaiúba

COMMON NAMES

Canané, rabirrubia, rubia

The species is found in the Western Central Atlantic region, from the US Atlantic coast, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, to Brazil. The stock structure is not clearly understood. Some studies mentioned that differences were not detected between Florida Keys and western Caribbe (including Belize, Yucatan Peninsula and Campeche Bank)(SEDAR 2012) while others genetic analysis revealed occurrence of up to four groupings (stocks) of yellowtail snapper: one in the Florida Keys, one along the west coast of Puerto Rico, one that includes the east coast of Puerto Rico and St. Thomas and one offshore of St. Croix (Saillant et al. 2012). However it’s not known if differences exist between Gulf of Mexico and West Caribbe. This profile refers to the Mexican Gulf Mexico management unit.


ANALYSIS

Strengths
  • Catches have been stable in the last years.
  • A network of marine protected areas is established and protected species identified.
  • Stock has traditionally not been a main target for fisheries.
  • A closed season is established.
Weaknesses
  • No specific scientific recommendations are known to exist for yellowtail snapper or species-specific management measures
  • No catch limits are defined.
  • No abundance estimates are available or reference points
  • The status of the stock is unknown: it was considered between full exploited and overexploited condition but status may have deteriorated since that stock assessment.
  • There are signs of non-compliance in protected areas.
  • Interaction of the fishery with protected species is not known but vulnerable ones are identified.
  • The stock is increasingly targeted as red snapper numbers fall.

FISHSOURCE SCORES

Management Quality:

Management Strategy:

< 6

Managers Compliance:

< 6

Fishers Compliance:

< 6

Stock Health:

Current
Health:

< 6

Future Health:

< 6


RECOMMENDATIONS

CATCHERS & REGULATORS

1. Conduct research to determine if Mexican yellowtail snapper is part of the same reproductive population as in other parts of the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean and Atlantic.
2. Conduct a yellowtail snapper stock assessment.
3. Develop a fishery management plan for the multi-species snapper fishery and set species-specific catch limits for yellowtail snapper.

RETAILERS & SUPPLY CHAIN

1. Contact CONAPESCA and request that they conduct stock assessments and develop a fishery management plan for the multi-species snapper fishery.
2. Request that your supply chain participates in SFP’s Gulf of Mexico Snapper Grouper Supplier Roundtable (http://www.sustainablefish.org/fisheries-improvement/snapper-and-grouper).
3. Start a FIP for this fishery.


FIPS

No related FIPs

CERTIFICATIONS

No related MSC fisheries

Fisheries

Within FishSource, the term "fishery" is used to indicate each unique combination of a flag country with a fishing gear, operating within a particular management unit, upon a resource. That resource may have a known biological stock structure and/or may be assessed at another level for practical or jurisdictional reasons. A fishery is the finest scale of resolution captured in FishSource profiles, as it is generally the scale at which sustainability can most fairly and practically be evaluated.

MANAGEMENT UNIT FLAG COUNTRY FISHING GEAR
Southern Gulf of Mexico Mexico Hooks and lines

Analysis

OVERVIEW

Last updated on 28 March 2018

Strengths
  • Catches have been stable in the last years.
  • A network of marine protected areas is established and protected species identified.
  • Stock has traditionally not been a main target for fisheries.
  • A closed season is established.
Weaknesses
  • No specific scientific recommendations are known to exist for yellowtail snapper or species-specific management measures
  • No catch limits are defined.
  • No abundance estimates are available or reference points
  • The status of the stock is unknown: it was considered between full exploited and overexploited condition but status may have deteriorated since that stock assessment.
  • There are signs of non-compliance in protected areas.
  • Interaction of the fishery with protected species is not known but vulnerable ones are identified.
  • The stock is increasingly targeted as red snapper numbers fall.
RECOMMENDATIONS

Last updated on 31 August 2016

Improvement Recommendations to Catchers & Regulators

1. Conduct research to determine if Mexican yellowtail snapper is part of the same reproductive population as in other parts of the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean and Atlantic.
2. Conduct a yellowtail snapper stock assessment.
3. Develop a fishery management plan for the multi-species snapper fishery and set species-specific catch limits for yellowtail snapper.

Recommendations to Retailers & Supply Chain

1. Contact CONAPESCA and request that they conduct stock assessments and develop a fishery management plan for the multi-species snapper fishery.
2. Request that your supply chain participates in SFP’s Gulf of Mexico Snapper Grouper Supplier Roundtable (http://www.sustainablefish.org/fisheries-improvement/snapper-and-grouper).
3. Start a FIP for this fishery.

1.STOCK STATUS

STOCK ASSESSMENT

Last updated on 27 March 2018

A stock assessment performed for yellowtail snapper in Mexican waters found it to be maximally utilised on the Campeche Bank and collapsed from Tamaulipas to Tabasco (Arreguín-Sánchez and Arcos-Huitrón 2011). Some studies on the reproductive biology (Trejo-Martínez et al. 2010) and on the diet (Rincón-Sandoval et al. 2009) of yellowtail snappers in Gulf of Mexico were developed recently.

SCIENTIFIC ADVICE

Last updated on 4 March 2018

The National Fisheries Institute (Instituto Nacional de Pesca, INAPESCA) belongs to the Secretary of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food (Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería, Desarrollo Rural, Pesca y Alimentación, SAGARPA) and coordinates and conducts scientific and technological research on fisheries and aquaculture resources (FAO 2005) and provides the advice for CONAPESCA. Since 2000 INAPESCA creates the National Fisheries Chart (Carta Nacional Pesquera, CNP) which should be updated yearly and is developed under the Fisheries Law. The CNP constitutes a state of the art review of Mexican fisheries (by species or group of species) and defines guidelines, strategies and measures for conservation, protection and management of the fishing resources.

No specific scientific recommendations are known to exist for yellowtail snapper. General advice for the assemblage is to continue to control access with a gear-specific permit system, focusing on selectivity (SAGARPA 2012)​.

Reference Points

Last updated on 04 Mar 2018

Total snapper assemblage catch should not exceed 4,295t (80% of historical maximum) in the Gulf of Mexico. No reference points are prescribed at species level (SAGARPA 2012).

CURRENT STATUS

Last updated on 27 February 2018

Yellowtail snapper is maximally utilised on the Campeche Bank and collapsed from Tamaulipas to Tabasco (Arreguín-Sánchez and Arcos-Huitrón 2011). Other sources consider the stock fished “at the sustainable maximum” in Tamaulipas, Quintana Roo and Tabasco (SAGARPA 2012). Total landings were 1,620 tons in 2012 but have been around 2,500 tons in 2016 and 2017.

Trends

Last updated on 27 Feb 2018

Landings oscillated around 300 tons and 500 tons in the 1970s. After increased to 2,220 tons in 1981 and declined to historical minimum in 1985 with 270 tons. The maximum was attained in 1990 at 3,200 tons and since then fluctuated between 500 – 1,900 tons (Diario Oficial de la Federacion (DOF) 2014). Abundance levels and exploitation levels are not available.

Due to deterioration of red grouper (Epinephelus morio), some species of snappers such as yellowtail snapper are now more frequently targeted by commercial fishers (Trejo-Martínez et al. 2010).

2.MANAGEMENT QUALITY

MANAGEMENT

Last updated on 4 March 2018

The National Commission of Aquaculture and Fisheries (Comissión Nacional de Acuacultura y Pesca, CONAPESCA) belongs to SAGARPA and is the regulatory agency, in charge of management, coordination and policy development of marine resources (FAO 2005).

Species-specific management measures are not known to exist rather than fishing licenses with gear requirements related with selectivity for the multispecies fishery (SAGARPA 2012). No catch limits are defined.

Recovery Plans

Last updated on 04 Mar 2018

No specific recovery plan is known to be in place for snapper species but the management plan for red grouper aims to have all associated species stocks at sustainable levels by 2022 (Diario Oficial de la Federacion (DOF) 2014).

COMPLIANCE

Last updated on 4 March 2018

Illegal fishing is detected in Natural Park Arrecife Alacranes (Parque Nacional Arrecife Alacranes (PNAA) n.d.) as well as in National Park Arrecifes de Cozumel. Control measures are considered insufficient and inefficient and also in Reserve of Biosphere Arrecifes de Sian Ka’an. Goals and actions for fisheries comprised in the management plan of National Park Arrecifes de Cozumel have not yet been accomplished (SAGARPA 2012).

Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS) have been installed on the industrial vessels since 2010. However, for example in Yucatan, the number of inspectors is very small (only 8) to enforce regulations in ~4,200 artesanal vessels (Scott 2014). Nonetheless, frequency of enforcement events has steadily increased in line with increasingly numerous inspections (SAGARPA-CONAPESCA 2016).

As a generality, IUU fishing may add 30% to the total off all recorded catches of all species across Mexico between 2002 and 2012 (Centro de Colaboración Cívica 2013) however this is intuitively likely to be less prevalent and less of an issue for non-target, under-exploited species.

3.ENVIRONMENT AND BIODIVERSITY

BYCATCH
ETP Species

Last updated on 27 February 2018

Hawksbill Turtle Eretmochelys imbricate (Critically endangered; (Mortimer and Donnelly 2008)) and loggerhead turtle Caretta caretta (IUCN 1996) are the main marine species within Biosphere Reserve “Ría Celestún” that can interact with the fishery. Green turtle Chelonia mydas (Endangered; (Seminoff 2004)), leatherback Dermochelys coriacea (Vulnerable; (IUCN 2013)) and hawksbill turtle Eretmochelys imbricata (Critically endangered; (Mortimer and Donnelly 2008)) nest in all islands of the Marine National Park Arrecife Alacranes (SEMARNAP 1998).

Common bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus (Least concern; (IUCN 2008)) is also distributed in Gulf of Mexico and there is no data for Tamaulipas. There are recorded interactions (death and permanent injuries) with fishing vessels oerating, in general (SAGARPA 2012).

However specific studies about the interaction of the fishery with Protected, Endangered and Threatened (PET) species are required (SAGARPA 2012).

Tropical coral reefs in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea and within the fishing area are considered to be subject to a “low level” and “high level” of threat (SEMARNAP 1998). Some of the coral species identified are in IUCN Red list: staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis (Critically Endangered), fragile saucer coral Agaricia fragilis (Data deficient); lettuce coral A. agaricites, grooved brain coral Diploria labyrinthiformis, symmetrical brain coral D. strigosa, smooth flower coral Eusmilia fastigiata, spiny flower coral Mussa angulosa, mustard hill coral Porites astreoides, finger coral P. porites, lesser starlet coral Siderastrea radians (all Least concern; (IUCN 2008) for all prior references) and Millepora alcicornis (Least concern; (IUCN 2008)) (SEMARNAP 1998).

Strong sanctions for damaging coral and killing turtles are in place (Scott 2014).

The artesanal fleet mainly focuses on Lutjanus synagris and Ocyurus chrysurus; only 6% total catch is recorded as "other", which  includes four ETP species (Lutjanus campechanus, Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps, Lachnolaimus maximus, Rhomboplites aurorubens) (IUCN 2017). Shark and ray species are reported in the catch but only Sphyrna lewini is considered ETP (Monroy et al. 2010)(Coronado and Salas 2011), constituting <1% catch volumes. Fishing mortality on ETP species is low and cumulative impacts are anticipated to be low also, though data are lacking. Closed areas/MPAs and closed seasons protect ETP species as well as target species.

Other Species

Last updated on 27 February 2018

Target species of the multispecies fishery is northern red snapper Lutjanus campechanus (76-90% of the catches). Yellowtail snapper (about 11%) and other species of Lutjanus spp. such as silk snapper Lutjanus vivanus and vermilion snapper Rhomboplites aurorubens are also captured (FAO 2007)(SAGARPA 2012).

The yellowtail snapper is also one of the main bycatch species in the red grouper artisanal fishery. A management plan for the red grouper fishery and associated fisheries in the Yucatán peninsula is in place since November 2014. This stock and associated species are expected to recovery by 2022 (Diario Oficial de la Federacion (DOF) 2014).

HABITAT

Last updated on 4 March 2018

Adult yellowtail snapper are commonly found near shore reefs, associated with hard or live bottom and also near the edge of shoals and banks, wrecks and artificial reefs (Trejo-Martínez et al. 2010).

Some coral species are not in the IUCN Red list (see summary for PET species), such as Colpophyllia amaranthus, Dichocaenia stokesii, Manicina arolata, Montastrea annularis, M. cavernosa, P. furgata (SEMARNAP 1998) but atolls' ecosystems are sensitive to impacts and the interaction with the fishery is not well understood.

There are no specific studies on possible impacts of this fishery in the ecosystem but the gear used has typically low impact in the seabed.

The ecosystem has been recently modelled, relating components to the environment (Sagarese et al. 2017)​.

Marine Reserves

Last updated on 04 Mar 2018

A network of Marine Protected Areas (MPA) is established in Mexican waters. A special license is to be required to Secretariat of Environment and Natural Resources (Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, SEMARNAT) to fish in protected areas and each one possess management programs which regulate activities within. Some MPA overlap with the fishing area (federal states of Tamaulipas, Vera Cruz, Tabasco, Campeche, Yucatán and Quintana Roo): National Park Arrecife de Alacranes, Reserve of Biosphere Arrecifes de Sian Ka’an, National Park Arrecifes de Xcalak, Reserve of Biosphere Banco Chinchorro, National Marine Park Isla Mujeres, Punta Cancún y Punta Nizuc, Laguna de Términos, Reserve of Biosphere Los Petenes, Reserve of Biosphere Ria Celestún, Reserva of Biosphere Los Tuxtlas, National Park Arrecifes de Cozumel, Arrecifes de Tuxpan.

In Tamaulipas (Rancho Nuevo Beach), Yucatán (beach near Río Lagartos) and Quintana Roo (Isla Contoy Beach) there are Sanctuaries for the protection and conservation of sea turtles. Fishing activities during the nesting period in a buffer area of 4 nautical miles are object of special rules (Agreement D.O.F. el 16 de julio de 2002) (SAGARPA 2012).

FishSource Scores

Last updated on 28 March 2018

SELECT SCORES

MANAGEMENT QUALITY

As calculated for 2018 data.

The score is < 6.

Considering the multispecies nature of the fishery, no catch limit or specific measures are defined for yellowtail snapper but only for northern red snapper, the main target species (an advised catch limit, a reduction of fishing effort and limitation of fishing licenses in some federal states; reduction of fishing mortality) (SAGARPA, 2012).

As calculated for 2018 data.

The score is < 6.

There are no catch limits or management decisions to ensure sustainable exploitation of the yellowtail snapper stock.

As calculated for 2018 data.

The score is < 6.

There is no data about fishers’ compliance. Reported signs of Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in protected areas (Scott, 2014).

STOCK HEALTH:

As calculated for 2018 data.

The score is < 6.

The stock is known to be in a maximally utilised or overexploited condition (Arreguin-Sanchez 2011) and status may have deteriorated since that stock assessment.

As calculated for 2018 data.

The score is < 6.

No stock improving is expected since the stock was in a maximally utilised or in overexploited condition (Arreguin-Sanchez 2011) and catches have been stable.

HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSE RISK

High Medium Low

This indicates the potential risk of human rights abuses for all fisheries operating within this stock or assessment unit. If there are more than on risk level noted, individual fisheries have different levels. Click on the "Select Scores" drop-down list for your fisheries of interest.

No data available for biomass
No data available for biomass
To see data for catch and tac, please view this site on a desktop.
No data available for fishing mortality
No data available for fishing mortality
No data available for recruitment
No data available for recruitment
To see data for management quality, please view this site on a desktop.
To see data for stock status, please view this site on a desktop.
DATA NOTES

Last updated on 4 March 2018

  • Yellowtail snapper in Mexico is caught in a multispecies fishery. 
  • Yellowtail snapper’s landings between 1970 and 2005 are from FAO/FIGIS (2014) and landings from 2006 to 2014 from SAGARPA (SAGARPA-CONAPESCA 2014) (Diario Oficial de la Federacion (DOF) 2014). Considering the multispecies nature of the fishery, Total Allowable Catches (TAC) are not defined for yellowtail snapper but only for the snapper assemblage (SAGARPA 2012).
  • Landings for 2015 to 2017 from (SIAP 2018) for yellowtail & lane snapper assemblage in Mexican Gulf of Mexico states.
  • Scores #1, #2 and #3 were determined qualitatively according to available information. (please mouse-over for further details).
  • No reference points are defined and time-series for abundance or fishing mortality are not available.

Download Source Data

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Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs)

No related FIPs

Certifications

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)

No related MSC certifications

Sources

Credits
  1. Aronson, R., Bruckner, A., Moore, J., Precht, B., E. Weil 2008. Acropora cervicornis, Agaricia fragilis, Agaricia agaricites. Diploria labyrinthiformis, Diploria strigosa, Eusmilia fastigiata, Mussa angulosa, Mustard Hill Coral. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2 [Accessed 06 May 2014] http://www.iucnredlist.org

  2. Comissión Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas (CONANP), undated. Ficha Descriptiva del Área Natural Protegida, Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales [Accessed 05 May 2014] https://simec.conanp.gob.mx/Info_completa_ext.php?id_direccion=1567

  3. FAO, 2005. National Aquaculture Legislation Overview, Mexico. National Aquaculture Legislation Overview (NALO) Fact Sheets. Text by Spreij, M. In: FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department [online], Rome. Updated 17 January 2005. [Accessed 18 April 2014] http://www.fao.org/fishery/legalframework/nalo_mexico/en

  4. Hammond, P.S., Bearzi, G., Bjørge, A., Forney, K.A., Karkzmarski, L., Kasuya, T., Perrin, W.F., Scott, M.D., Wang, J.Y. , Wells, R.S. & Wilson, B. 2012. Tursiops truncatus. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2 [Accessed 09 May 2014] http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/22563/0

  5. Instituto Nacional de Ecologia (INE), 1996. Parque Marino Nacional Arrecife Alacranes. Secretaría de Medio Ambiente, Recursos Naturales y Pesca, Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad [Accessed 06 May 2014] http://www2.inecc.gob.mx/publicaciones/libros/2/alacranes.html?id_pub=2

  6. Marine Turtle Specialist Group (MTSG), 1996. Caretta caretta. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2 [Accessed 05 May 2014] http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/3897/0

  7. Mortimer, J.A and Donnelly, M. (IUCN SSC Marine Turtle Specialist Group) 2008. Eretmochelys imbricata. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2 [Accessed 05 May 2014] http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/8005/0

  8. Natural Park Arrecife Alacranes (PNAA), undated. Problemática [Accessed 05 May 2014] http://arrecifealacranes.conanp.gob.mx/problematica.php

  9. Obura, D., Fenner, D., Hoeksema, B., Devantier, L., Sheppard, C. 2008. Millepora alcicornis. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2 [Accessed 06 May 2014] http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/133144/0

  10. Oficina Estatal de Información para el Desarrollo Rural Sustentable de Estado de Sonora (OEIDRUS), 2005. Normatividad del sector pesquero, 13pp. http://www.oeidrus-sonora.gob.mx/documentos/Pesca/normatividad_pesca.swf

  11. O’Hop, J., Murphy, M., Chagaris, D. 2012. The 2012 Stock Assessment Report for Yellowtail Snapper in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 341pp. http://www.sefsc.noaa.gov/sedar/download/YTS_FWC_SAR.pdf?id=DOCUMENT

  12. Rincón-Sandoval, L.A., Brulé, T., Montero-Muñoz, J.L., Pérez-Díaz, E. 2009. Dieta de la Rabirrubia Ocyurus chrysurus (Lutjanidae: Lutjaninae) y su Variación Temporal en la Costa de Yucatán, México. Proceedings of the 62nd Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institut, November 2 - 6, 2009 Cumana, Venezuela. Pp 207-218. http://nsgl.gso.uri.edu/flsgp/flsgpc09001/data/papers/029.pdf

  13. Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería, Desarrollo Rural, Pesca y Alimentación (SAGARPA), 2012. Carta Nacional Pesquera (CNP). Diario Oficial, Segunda sección, Viernes 24 de agosto de 2012, INAPESCA, 236 pp. http://www.inapesca.gob.mx/portal/documentos/publicaciones/CARTA%20NACIONAL%20PESQUERA/24082012%20SAGARPA.pdf

  14. Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería, Desarrollo Rural, Pesca y Alimentación (SAGARPA), 2014. Registro y Estadística Pesquera y Acuícola [Accessed 14 May 2014] http://www.conapesca.sagarpa.gob.mx/wb/cona/registro_y_estadistica_pesquera_y_acuicola

  15. Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT), undated. Arrecifes artificales [Accessed 05 May 2014] http://app1.semarnat.gob.mx/dgeia/informe_04/04_biodiversidad/recuadros/c_rec5_04.htm

  16. Seminoff, J.A. (Southwest Fisheries Science Center, U.S.) 2004. Chelonia mydas. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2 [Accessed 06 May 2014] http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/4615/0

  17. SAGARPA, 2014b. Acuerdo por el que se da a conocer el Plan de Manejo Pesquero de Mero (Epinephelus morio) y especies asociadas en la Península de Yucatán. Diario oficial 25 Noviembre 2014. http://www.inapesca.gob.mx/portal/documentos/Planes-de-Manejo-Pesquero/Golfo/2014_11_25_MAT_sagarpa-PLAN-DE-MERO.pdf
  18. Saillant, E. A., Renshaw, M. A., Cummings, N. J., Gold, J. R. 2012. Conservation genetics and management of yellowtail snapper, Ocyurus chrysurus, in the US Caribbean and South Florida. Fisheries Management and Ecology, 19 (4): 301–312 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2400.2011.00840.x/abstract
  19. Scott, I., 2014. Pre-Assessment Report for The Campeche Grouper Fishery Final. Intertek Fisheries Certification Ltd, June 2014. 62pp http://cedepesca.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/grouper-msc.pdf
  20. Seijo, J. C., 2007. Estimación de riesgo de exceder puntos de referencia límite por sobrecapacidade del esfuerzo en pesquerías secuenciales: la pesquería de mero (Epinephelus morio) de la plataforma continental de Yucatán. Pp: 257-273 In Max Agüero (ed.). Capacidad de pesca y manejo pesquero en América Latina y el Caribe. FAO Documento Tecnico de Pesca nº 461. Rome , FAO 403pphttp://www.fao.org/docrep/010/a0236s/a0236s00.HTM
  21. Trejo-Martínez, J., Brulé, T. and Sanchez-Crespo, M. 2010. Reproduction in Yellowtail Snapper Ocyurus chrysurus B. 1790, from the Campeche Bank, Southeastern Gulf of Mexico. Proceedings of the 63rd Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute, November 1 - 5, 2010 San Juan, Puerto Rico . Pp 221-229.http://nsgl.gso.uri.edu/flsgp/flsgpw10002/data/papers/043.pdf
  22. Wallace, B.P., Tiwari, M., Girondot, M. 2013. Dermochelys coriacea. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2 [Accessed 06 May 2014] http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/6494/0
References

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    Yellowtail snapper - Mexico

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