Last updated on 22 September 2016

SUMMARY

SUMMARY

IDENTIFICATION

SCIENTIFIC NAME(s)

Limanda limanda

SPECIES NAME(s)

Common dab

COMMON NAMES

Common dab, Dab

Some scientific evidence distinguishes Common dab of western British waters from the North Sea and Baltic Sea but the stock structure is not fully understood. A Celtic Seas assessment area has been proposed based on current knowledge (ICES, 2012).


ANALYSIS

Strengths

The species is part of a list of species with increasing commercial importance assessed by ICES (WGNEW).

Weaknesses

No formal stock assessment is carried out. No minimum landing size is defined nor a TAC. Information on stock structure is insufficient to identify possible separate stocks for management and assessment purposes. Data on environmental impacts of the fishery is also lacking.

Options

Combine all essential data from different fishing countries to conduct a formal stock assessment. Conduct further research on stock structure. Support more research on the environmental impacts of the fishery.

FISHSOURCE SCORES

Management Quality:

Management Strategy:

NOT YET SCORED

Managers Compliance:

NOT YET SCORED

Fishers Compliance:

NOT YET SCORED

Stock Health:

Current
Health:

NOT YET SCORED

Future Health:

NOT YET SCORED


FIPS

No related FIPs

CERTIFICATIONS

No related MSC fisheries

Fisheries

Within FishSource, the term "fishery" is used to indicate each unique combination of a flag country with a fishing gear, operating within a particular management unit, upon a resource. That resource may have a known biological stock structure and/or may be assessed at another level for practical or jurisdictional reasons. A fishery is the finest scale of resolution captured in FishSource profiles, as it is generally the scale at which sustainability can most fairly and practically be evaluated.

ASSESSMENT UNIT MANAGEMENT UNIT FLAG COUNTRY FISHING GEAR
Celtic Sea and English Channel European Union, Divisions VIIb-k United Kingdom Beam trawls
Single boat bottom otter trawls

Analysis

OVERVIEW

Last updated on 9 April 2013

Strengths

The species is part of a list of species with increasing commercial importance assessed by ICES (WGNEW).

Weaknesses

No formal stock assessment is carried out. No minimum landing size is defined nor a TAC. Information on stock structure is insufficient to identify possible separate stocks for management and assessment purposes. Data on environmental impacts of the fishery is also lacking.

Options

Combine all essential data from different fishing countries to conduct a formal stock assessment. Conduct further research on stock structure. Support more research on the environmental impacts of the fishery.

1.STOCK STATUS

STOCK ASSESSMENT

Last updated on 9 April 2013

No formal stock assessment is carried out. The fishery is not directed at Common dab, being a bycatch of other target species (ICES, 2012).

SCIENTIFIC ADVICE

Last updated on 9 April 2013

Common dab is one of the species included in the Report of the Working Group on Assessment of New Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) Species (WGNEW) established to provide information on the new species of the MoU between ICES and the European Commission (NESPMAN, 2010).

CEFAS conducted an assessment on species that were often discarded due to their low commercial value. The assessment, “Relative Life History Sensitivity Analysis”, used biological data such as growth and breeding strategies to evaluate how fishing pressure can affect each species. Dab was amongst the species considered resilient to over-fishing (Catchpole, 2011). No specific recommendations other that encouraging consumers to choose this species were made.

Reference Points

Last updated on 09 Apr 2013

No analytical stock assessment; thus no reference points defined for this stock.

CURRENT STATUS

Last updated on 9 April 2013

Stock status is unknown. According to a qualitative assessment conducted by CEFAS (“Relative Life History Sensitivity Analysis”), the species was included among the most tolerant to over-fishing (Catchpole, 2011).

Trends

Last updated on 09 Apr 2013

Information on stock biomass or fishing mortality is unknown. According to ICES (2012), annual landings of Common dab in ICES Divisions III, IV, and VII (combined) have been above 10,000 tonnes since 2010. In the UK, landings peaked in the mid-90s, at around 1,400 tonnes, and have been showing a decreasing trend since then (NESPMAN, 2010).

2.MANAGEMENT QUALITY

MANAGEMENT

Last updated on 9 April 2013

No TACs or other specific management measures (e.g. minimum size limits) are in place for this species. Trawlers that take dab as bycatch are however subject to gear restrictions such as minimum mesh sizes.

Recovery Plans

Last updated on 09 Apr 2013

Stock status is unknown. Not applicable.

COMPLIANCE

Last updated on 9 April 2013

No minimum landing size is defined as any Total Allowable Catch (TAC) for this area (ICES, 2012). Common dab is taken as by-catch of other flatfish fisheries (e.g. plaice, sole). It is also amongst the most discarded species in these fisheries (ICES, 2012).

In the UK, scientists and managers have however been working on the development of new fishing technologies to reduce discards (DEFRA, 2011). One of the most recent projects aimed at identifying the key reasons for discarding and to develop more selective fishing gears (CEFAS, 2010).

3.ENVIRONMENT AND BIODIVERSITY

BYCATCH
ETP Species

Last updated on 9 April 2013

Cetacean bycatch in demersal trawling in the UK is generally rare and not thought to pose a risk (Defra, 2003). Interactions of the fishery with skates and rays are considered to be high in some areas (ICES, 2008).

Other Species

Last updated on 9 April 2013

Common dab is mainly a bycatch in fisheries for European plaice Pleuronectes platessa, European sole Solea solea, demersal roundfish (ICES, 2012) and Nephrops fisheries with otter trawls (NESPMAN, 2010).

In the UK, scientists and managers have been working together to reduce discards in the trawling fisheries (see compliance section).

HABITAT

Last updated on 9 April 2013

The impacts of demersal trawling on the benthic habitats have been extensively studied in European waters, particularly in the North Sea (e.g., Callaway et al., 2007; Hinz et al., 2009; Lengkeek and Bouma, 2010). Demersal trawling has been found to affect ecosystem function, both in terms of species richness, abundance and biomass, as well as physical habitat structure.

Information on the impact of this specific fishery is however scarce.

Marine Reserves

Last updated on 09 Apr 2013

A comprehensive network of Marine Protected Areas has been designated in the UK (JNCC, 2012).

FishSource Scores

SELECT SCORES

MANAGEMENT QUALITY

STOCK HEALTH:

No data available for biomass
No data available for biomass
To see data for catch and tac, please view this site on a desktop.
No data available for fishing mortality
No data available for fishing mortality
No data available for recruitment
No data available for recruitment
No data available for management quality
No data available for management quality
No data available for stock status
No data available for stock status

No related analysis

Download Source Data

Registered users can download the original data file for calculating the scores after logging in. If you wish, you can Register now.

Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs)

No related FIPs

Certifications

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)

No related MSC certifications

Sources

Credits

Additional References and Sources

Callaway, R., Engelhard, G.H., Dann, J., Cotter, J. and Rumohr, H., 2007. A century of North Sea epibenthos and trawling: comparison between 1902-1912, 1982-1985 and 2000. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 346: 27-43.

Hinz, Hilmar, Prieto, Virginia and Kaiser, Michel J., 2009. Trawl disturbance on benthic communities: chronic effects and experimental predictions. Ecological Applications, 19, 3: 761-773.

  1. Catchpole, T., 2011. Identifying underutilised species. Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS). January 2011. 7 pp.http://cefas.defra.gov.uk/media/520068/underutilised%20species.pdf
  2. CEFAS, 2010. The Project 50%. Final project report. Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS). 36 pp.http://www.cefas.defra.gov.uk/media/433833/project_50_printed_final_report.pdf
  3. CEFAS, 2011. Discards and fishing gear technology: Improving selectivity - reducing discards. Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) website. [Last modified06 September 2011]http://www.cefas.defra.gov.uk/our-science/fisheries-information/discards-and-fishing-gear-technology.aspx
  4. ICES. 2008. Report of the ICES Advisory Committee 2008. ICES Advice, 2008. Book 5, 267 pp.http://www.ices.dk/sites/pub/Publication%20Reports/ICES%20Advice/2008/ICES%20ADVICE%202008%20Book%205.pdf
  5. ICES, 2010. Report of the Working Group on Assessment of New MoU Species (WGNEW), 11-15 October 2010, ICES HQ, Denmark. ICES CM 2010/ACOM: 21. 185 pp.http://ices.dk/sites/pub/Publication%20Reports/Expert%20Group%20Report/acom/2010/WGNEW/WGNEW%202010%20.pdf
  6. ICES, 2012. Report of the Working Group on Assessment of New MoU Species (WGNEW), 5-9 March 2012. ICES CM 2012/ACOM: 20, 258 pp.http://ices.dk/sites/pub/Publication%20Reports/Expert%20Group%20Report/acom/2012/WGNEW/WGNEW%20final%20May%202012.pdf
  7. JNCC, 2012. Marine Protected Area Network of the UK. Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) website. [Accessed on 09 April 2013]http://jncc.defra.gov.uk/page-4549
  8. Lengkeek, W. and Bouma, S., 2010. Impacts of beam trawl fisheries in the North Sea: A summary of fifty-five publications. Bureau Waardenburg bv. Final Report: 10-048. 44 pp.http://assets.ocean2012.eu/publication_documents/documents/10/original/Impacts_of_beam_trawl_fisheries_in_the_North_Sea.pdf
  9. New Species for Management (NESPMAN), 2010. Report NESPMAN - Improving the knowledge of the biology and the fisheries of the new species for management for the European Commission, DG Maritime Affairs & Fisheries, Part 2, 441 p.http://ec.europa.eu/fisheries/documentation/studies/nespman02_en.pdf

Appended content

  1. ICES, 2010. Report of the Working Group on Assessment of New MoU Species (WGNEW), 11-15 October 2010, ICES HQ, Denmark. ICES CM 2010/ACOM: 21. 185 pp. http://ices.dk/sites/pub/Publication%20Reports/Expert%20Group%20Report/acom/2010/WGNEW/WGNEW%202010%20.pdf
  2. ICES, 2012. Report of the Working Group on Assessment of New MoU Species (WGNEW), 5-9 March 2012. ICES CM 2012/ACOM: 20, 258 pp. http://ices.dk/sites/pub/Publication%20Reports/Expert%20Group%20Report/acom/2012/WGNEW/WGNEW%20final%20May%202012.pdf
    References

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      Common dab - Celtic Sea and English Channel

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