SUMMARY

SUMMARY

IDENTIFICATION

SCIENTIFIC NAME(s)

Dipturus innominatus

SPECIES NAME(s)

New Zealand smooth skate, smooth skate

COMMON NAMES

New Zealand smooth skate

Smooth skate (Dipturus innominata, SSK), which are also known as barndoor skates, are fished commercially in close association with rough skates (RSK) in New Zealand. Smooth skates grow considerably larger than rough skates, but both species are landed and processed (Francis 1997). Two other species of deepwater skate (Bathyraja shuntovi and Raja hyperborea) are large enough to be of commercial interest but are relatively uncommon and probably comprise a negligible proportion of the landings (MPI 2011).

In lack of knowledge about the stock structure of New Zealand smooth skate, the species is managed according to the five fishstocks (and correspondent fishing management areas): RSK 1 Auckland East (FMA 1, 2); RSK 3 South East Coast, South East Chatham Rise, Sub-Antarctic, Southland (FMA 3, 4, 5, 6) here named as SE New Zealand; RSK 7 Challenger (FMA 7); and RSK 8 Central Egmont and Auckland West (FMA 8, 9) (MPI 2014).

New Zealand rough skate Zearaja nasuta and New Zealand smooth skate Dipturus innominatus are captured in the same multispecies fishery but managed separately (MPI 2014).


ANALYSIS

No related analysis

FISHSOURCE SCORES

Management Quality:

Management Strategy:

NOT YET SCORED

Managers Compliance:

NOT YET SCORED

Fishers Compliance:

NOT YET SCORED

Stock Health:

Current
Health:

NOT YET SCORED

Future Health:

NOT YET SCORED


FIPS

No related FIPs

CERTIFICATIONS

No related MSC fisheries

Fisheries

Within FishSource, the term "fishery" is used to indicate each unique combination of a flag country with a fishing gear, operating within a particular management unit, upon a resource. That resource may have a known biological stock structure and/or may be assessed at another level for practical or jurisdictional reasons. A fishery is the finest scale of resolution captured in FishSource profiles, as it is generally the scale at which sustainability can most fairly and practically be evaluated.

ASSESSMENT UNIT MANAGEMENT UNIT FLAG COUNTRY FISHING GEAR
Auckland East New Zealand SSK1 New Zealand Single boat bottom otter trawls
Single boat midwater otter trawls

Analysis

OVERVIEW

1.STOCK STATUS

STOCK ASSESSMENT

Last updated on 17 November 2016

Trawl survey biomass indices in the main abundance area of east coast South Island show no trends, though there is evidence of inter-annual variation in catchability that may invalidate the time series.

MCY cannot be estimated.

CAY cannot be estimated.

No other yield estimates are available.

(MPI 2014)

SCIENTIFIC ADVICE

Last updated on 17 November 2016

Reference Points

Last updated on 17 Nov 2016

No estimates of current and reference biomass are available.

(MPI 2014)

CURRENT STATUS

Last updated on 17 November 2016

No estimates of current and reference biomass are available. For rough skate it is Unknown if recent catch levels or the TACC will cause their populations to decline (MPI 2014).

Trends

Last updated on 17 Nov 2016

Total skate landings (based on the “best estimate”) were negligible up to 1978, presumably because of a lack of suitable markets and the availability of other more abundant and desirable species. Landings then increased linearly to reach nearly 3000 t in 1992-93 and 1993-94, and have remained between 2600 and 3100 t ever since (MPI 2014).

Because skates are taken mainly as bycatch of bottom trawl fisheries, historical catches have probably been proportional to the amount of effort in the target trawl fisheries. Past catches were probably higher than historical landings data suggest, because of unrecorded discards and unrecorded foreign catch before 1983 (Francis 1997).

Commercial catch of around 1,000 tonnes per year in bottom trawl and bottom longline fisheries (exact quantities are unknown because rough [Dipturus nasutus] and smooth skates are frequently lumped in landings statistics). Skates are not targeted, but are retained when caught.

2.MANAGEMENT QUALITY

MANAGEMENT

Last updated on 17 November 2016

A total competitive quota of 900 tonnes for all skates and rays was introduced in 1991-92 for the east coast of South Island, but landings have exceeded the quota every year since it was introduced. The Ministry of Fisheries proposes to introduce rough skate into the Quota Management System in October 2003.

3.ENVIRONMENT AND BIODIVERSITY

No related analysis

FishSource Scores

SELECT SCORES

MANAGEMENT QUALITY

STOCK HEALTH:

No data available
No data available
No data available
No data available
No data available
No data available
No data available
No data available
No data available
No data available
No data available
No data available

No related analysis

Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs)

No related FIPs

Certifications

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)

No related MSC certifications

Sources

Credits
  1. Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), 2014. Fisheries Assessment Plenary, May 2014: stock assessments and stock status. Compiled by the Fisheries Science Group, Ministry for Primary Industries, Wellington, New Zealand. 1381 p. http://fs.fish.govt.nz/Doc/23541/Fisheries%20Assessment%20Plenary%20May%202014%20Volume%203.pdf.ashx

  2. Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), 2011. Fisheries Assessment Plenary, May 2011: stock assessments and stock status. Compiled by the Fisheries Science Group, Ministry for Primary Industries, Wellington, New Zealand. http://deepwatergroup.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/MPI-2012-Fisheries-Assessment-Plenary-%E2%80%93-May-2012-%E2%80%93-Volume-2.pdf

  3. Francis, M.P. 1997. A summary of biology and commercial landings and a stock assessment of rough and smooth skates (Raja nasuta and R. innominata). New Zealand Fisheries Assessment Research Document 97/5.

References

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    New Zealand smooth skate - Auckland East

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