SUMMARY

SUMMARY

IDENTIFICATION

SCIENTIFIC NAME(s)

Scomberomorus commerson

SPECIES NAME(s)

Narrow-barred Spanish mackerel

COMMON NAMES

Snook, Spaniard

Narrow-barred spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson) are widespread in the Indo-West Pacific, can be found from the Red Sea and South Africa to Southeast Asia, north to China and Japan and south to southeast Australia, and to Fiji. It is targeted in artisanal, commercial and recreational fisheries in many parts of its range, are caught primarily with gillnets, but also caught with purse seines, and worldwide reported landings show a gradual increase from 7,186 tonnes in 1950 to 23,5985 tonnes in 2006 (FAO 2009). This species is also taken as bycatch in long-line, purse-seine and gill net gear targeting larger scombrids. Several sub-regional stock assessment in the Western Indian Ocean report this species to be heavily overexploited (McPherson 1992).

Genetic evidence indicates that there are three biological stocks of Spanish Mackerel across northern Australia; however, evidence from otolith microchemistry, parasite analysis and limited adult movement (at scales greater than 100 km) indicates that there are likely to be a number of smaller biological stocks with limited interaction (Shaklee et al. 1990).

Although each jurisdiction is likely to have multiple biological stocks within its boundaries, the difficulty in obtaining relevant biological and catch-and-effort information to assess each stock individually has meant that Spanish Mackerel has been grouped into two biological stocks (Torres Strait and east coast [Queensland]), two management units (Gulf of Carpentaria [Queensland] and Mackerel Managed Fishery [Western Australia]) and one jurisdiction (Northern Territory) (Begg et al. 2006).

The assessments that are not undertaken at the biological stock level are based on the populations that receive the highest harvest rates; their status can be assumed to be representative of the highest level of exploitation that occurs on any population within each management unit or jurisdiction (Patterson et al. 2016).


ANALYSIS

No related analysis

FISHSOURCE SCORES

Management Quality:

Management Strategy:

NOT YET SCORED

Managers Compliance:

NOT YET SCORED

Fishers Compliance:

NOT YET SCORED

Stock Health:

Current
Health:

NOT YET SCORED

Future Health:

NOT YET SCORED


RECOMMENDATIONS

RETAILERS & SUPPLY CHAIN
  • This profile is not currently high on our priority list for development, and we can’t at this time provide an accurate prediction of when it will be developed. To speed up an evaluation of the sustainability status of lower priority fisheries we have initiated a program whereby industry can directly contract SFP-approved analysts to develop a FishSource profile on a fishery. More information on this External Contributor Program is available at https://www.sustainablefish.org/Programs/Science/External-Contributor-Program.

FIPS

No related FIPs

CERTIFICATIONS

No related MSC fisheries

Fisheries

Within FishSource, the term "fishery" is used to indicate each unique combination of a flag country with a fishing gear, operating within a particular management unit, upon a resource. That resource may have a known biological stock structure and/or may be assessed at another level for practical or jurisdictional reasons. A fishery is the finest scale of resolution captured in FishSource profiles, as it is generally the scale at which sustainability can most fairly and practically be evaluated.

MANAGEMENT UNIT FLAG COUNTRY FISHING GEAR
Mackerel Managed Fishery Australia Handlines hand operated
Trolling lines

Analysis

OVERVIEW

RECOMMENDATIONS

Last updated on 28 January 2019

Recommendations to Retailers & Supply Chain
  • This profile is not currently high on our priority list for development, and we can’t at this time provide an accurate prediction of when it will be developed. To speed up an evaluation of the sustainability status of lower priority fisheries we have initiated a program whereby industry can directly contract SFP-approved analysts to develop a FishSource profile on a fishery. More information on this External Contributor Program is available at https://www.sustainablefish.org/Programs/Science/External-Contributor-Program.

1.STOCK STATUS

STOCK ASSESSMENT

Last updated on 28 October 2016

 As the minimum legal size for Spanish Mackerel is 900 mm total length, which is similar to the size at maturity for this species, the spawning stock is essentially the same as the exploited stock. Therefore, the status of the Spanish Mackerel spawning stock is measured using the catch rates for each area of the fishery. Catch rates are either continuing to increase or are stable at relatively high levels within each management area, suggesting that the overall spawning stock is increasing (Mackie et al. 2003). 

CURRENT STATUS

Last updated on 28 October 2016

The total catches of Spanish Mackerel remain within the target range. Spanish Mackerel in Western Australia is not considered to be recruitment overfished, and the current level of fishing mortality is unlikely to cause the stock to become recruitment overfished. On the basis of the evidence provided above, the management unit is classified as a sustainable stock (Mackie et al. 2003).

Trends

Last updated on 28 Oct 2016

Fishing effort throughout the Mackerel Managed Fishery (Western Australia) has been relatively stable since 2006, following reductions due to management changes. The high catch rates for the two main fishery areas, both near record levels, indicate a relatively high abundance of Spanish Mackerel in these management areas (Patterson et al. 2016)).

Catch rates in other areas have remained stable at relatively high levels since 2007. 

2.MANAGEMENT QUALITY

MANAGEMENT

Last updated on 28 October 2016

The commercial fishery is currently open-access, and therefore any fisher with a WA wetline license can catch mackerel. However, following extensive liaison between the Department of Fisheries and industry members the fishery is likely to come under formal management in 2004. This management will probably be based on a total allowable commercial catch within each region, and only those boats with sufficient historic catches prior to a benchmark date (3rd November 1997) will be permitted access. The amount of quota apportioned to these boats will be determined from their historic catch as a proportion of total catch in each region, although only those with a minimum holding will actually be able to fish (Mackie et al. 2003).

3.ENVIRONMENT AND BIODIVERSITY

BYCATCH
ETP Species

Last updated on 28 October 2016

Commercial gillnets interact with threatened, endangered and protected species. Although reported interactions are low, the impact on the populations of these species is unknown.

Other Species

Last updated on 28 October 2016

Targeted fishing for all Spanish Mackerel in Western Australia and most Spanish Mackerel fishing in the other jurisdictions uses trolled lines. This method has almost no direct impact on the habitats where it is used and results in little bycatch.

HABITAT

Last updated on 28 October 2016

The TSFF was reaccredited under part 13 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) on 9 July 2013 and under part 13A on 17 July 2013. The accreditation under part 13A expires on 25 November 2016.

No ecological risk assessments have been conducted for the TSFF. The strategic assessment report assumes that the impacts of fishing on the ecosystem are restricted to anchoring, mooring and other anthropogenic activities; vessel accidents, leading to pollution such as oil spills; and potential translocation of species via hull and anchor fouling. The report concludes that direct impacts on the environment are likely to be minimal because of the low-impact nature of the hook-and-line fishing methods used in the fishery.

Targeted fishing for all Spanish Mackerel in Western Australia and most Spanish Mackerel fishing in the other jurisdictions uses trolled lines. This method has almost no direct impact on the habitats where it is used and results in little bycatch.

Last updated on 28 October 2016

An analysis of community structure of finfish in the bioregions in Western Australia16 where mackerel fishing has been undertaken has found no evidence of any significant shift over the past 30 years.

FishSource Scores

SELECT SCORES

MANAGEMENT QUALITY

STOCK HEALTH:

No data available
No data available
No data available
No data available
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No data available

No related analysis

Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs)

No related FIPs

Certifications

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)

No related MSC certifications

Sources

Credits
  1. Patterson, H, Noriega, R, Georgeson, L, Stobutzki, I & Curtotti, R 2016, Fishery status reports 2016, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, Canberra. CC BY 3.0. http://apo.org.au/files/Resource/00_fishstatus2016_1.0.0_lr.pdf​

  2. Begg, GA, Chen, CCM, O’Neill, MF & Rose, DB 2006, Stock assessment of the Torres Strait Spanish Mackerel Fishery, technical report 66, CRC Reef Research Centre, Townsville.

  3. Mackie, M., Lewis, P. D., Gaughan, D. J. and Buckworth, R. C. 2003. Stock assessment of Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson) in Western Australia. Final Report. Fisheries Research and Development Corporation Project 1999/151. Fisheries Department of Western Australia.

  4. McPherson, G.R. 1992. Age and growth of the narrow-barred Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson Lacepede, 1800) in northeastern Queensland waters. Austral. J. Mar. Freshw. Res. 43: 1269-1282.

  5. Shaklee, J.B., S.R Phelps, and J. Saint. 1990. Analysis of fish stock structure and mixed-stock fisheries by the electrophoretic characterization of allelic isozymes. In: D.H. Whitmore (ed.), Electrophoretic and isoelectric focusing techniques in fisheries management,, pp. 174-196. CRC Press.

  6. Buckworth, R. C., Newman, S. J., Ovenden, J. R., Lester, R. J. G., and McPherson, G. R. (2007). The Stock Structure of Northern and Western Australian Spanish Mackerel. Final Report, Fisheries Research & Development Corporation Project 1998/159. Department of Primary Industry, Fisheries and Mines, Northern Territory Government, Australia. Fishery Report 88, i-vi, 225 p.http://www.nt.gov.au/d/Content/File/p/Fish_Rep/FR88.pdf

  7. Northern Territory Government (NTG), 2011. Fishery Status Reports 2009. Northern Territory Government, Department of Resources, Fishery Report No. 106, 165 p.http://www.nt.gov.au/d/Content/File/p/Fish_Rep/FR106.pdf

  8. Spanish Mackerel Fishery Management Plan, 2010. Northern Territory of Australia, 8 p.http://notes.nt.gov.au/dcm/legislat/legislat.nsf/2afcb7bfe1e1348e6925705a001697fb/102fd540c7e71e63692576a8000fee2a/$FILE/Repf009R7.pdf

References

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    Narrow-barred Spanish mackerel - Western Australia

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