Last updated on 21 October 2016

SUMMARY

SUMMARY

IDENTIFICATION

SCIENTIFIC NAME(s)

Coryphaena hippurus

SPECIES NAME(s)

Common dolphinfish, Mahi-mahi


ANALYSIS

Weaknesses

There is very little information avaialable on the status of mahi mahi in the Indian Ocean region. There are no comprehensive assessments and no international management measures in place. Management at the national levels appears to be weak as well. There are bycatch issues with sharks in Indian Ocean longline fisheries.

Options

Improve data collection and promote the need for a stock wide assessment so that appropriate management measures can be implemented. Advise countries (i.e. Spain and Portugal) to refrain from using wire leaders and in exchange use monofilament leaders – to reduce the incidental capture of sharks.

FISHSOURCE SCORES

Management Quality:

Management Strategy:

< 6

Managers Compliance:

< 6

Fishers Compliance:

NOT YET SCORED

Stock Health:

Current
Health:

< 6

Future Health:

< 6


FIPS

  • Indonesia Indian Ocean tuna - longline:

    Stage 4, Progress Rating B

  • Longline tuna and large pelagics:

    Stage 4, Progress Rating B

CERTIFICATIONS

No related MSC fisheries

Fisheries

Within FishSource, the term "fishery" is used to indicate each unique combination of a flag country with a fishing gear, operating within a particular management unit, upon a resource. That resource may have a known biological stock structure and/or may be assessed at another level for practical or jurisdictional reasons. A fishery is the finest scale of resolution captured in FishSource profiles, as it is generally the scale at which sustainability can most fairly and practically be evaluated.

ASSESSMENT UNIT MANAGEMENT UNIT FLAG COUNTRY FISHING GEAR
Indian Ocean IOTC Indonesia Drifting longlines
Pole-lines hand operated
Spain Longlines

Analysis

OVERVIEW

Weaknesses

There is very little information avaialable on the status of mahi mahi in the Indian Ocean region. There are no comprehensive assessments and no international management measures in place. Management at the national levels appears to be weak as well. There are bycatch issues with sharks in Indian Ocean longline fisheries.

Options

Improve data collection and promote the need for a stock wide assessment so that appropriate management measures can be implemented. Advise countries (i.e. Spain and Portugal) to refrain from using wire leaders and in exchange use monofilament leaders – to reduce the incidental capture of sharks.

1.STOCK STATUS

STOCK ASSESSMENT

Last updated on 27 February 2014

There are very few scientific studies, coupled with inadequate collection of adequate catch and fishing effort data to conduct reliable stock assessments for Mahi mahi stock in the Indian Ocean. No comprehensive stock based assessment has been conducted but regional assessments have been conducted in areas such as India (Benjamin and Kurup 2012).

SCIENTIFIC ADVICE

Last updated on 19 November 2012

No scientific advice has been provided at the stock level for mahi mahi in the Indian Ocean.

Reference Points

Last updated on 19 Nov 2012

Reference points have not been estimated for this stock in the Indian Ocean.

CURRENT STATUS

Last updated on 19 November 2012

There is a high degree of uncertainty on status of the stock and a comprehensive stock assessment is lacking for mahi mahi throughout its range in the Indian Ocean.Globally mahi mahi are considered a species of Least Concern by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (Collete et al. 2011).

Trends

Last updated on 19 Nov 2012

Such data is not available for Mahi Mahi stocks in the Indian Ocean.

2.MANAGEMENT QUALITY

MANAGEMENT

Last updated on 19 November 2012

The dolphinfish stocks are not adequately regulated or managed through national or regional fishery management organizations in this region.There are no international management measures in place for mahimahi caught in longlines, through the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission, a regional fisheries management organization (IOTC 2013).

Recovery Plans

Last updated on 19 Nov 2012

None are reported for this stock in the Indian Ocean.

IOTC
Indonesia
Drifting longlines

Last updated on 13 December 2010

There are no international management measures in place specifically for mahi mahi in the Indian Ocean {IOTC 2013}.Indonesia has some measures in place for their tuna fishery that may impact mahi mahi.There is a logbook program in place, but there are issues with the coverage and quality of submissions. Vessels larger than 30 GT must have a vessel monitoring system in place.There is an observer program and port sampling programs – per IOTC mandate – in place for tuna fisheries that may apply to mahi mahi {Satria et al. 2013}.

COMPLIANCE

Last updated on 14 December 2011

There are no catch limits in place at the international level.

IOTC
Indonesia
Drifting longlines

Last updated on 13 December 2010

There are issues in the logbook program with regards to the quality of data and the coverage amount.Indonesia is in compliance with the Indian Ocean Tuna Commissions mandate for an observer and port sampling programs {Satria et al. 2013}.

3.ENVIRONMENT AND BIODIVERSITY

BYCATCH
ETP Species

Last updated on 14 December 2011

A number of bycatch species are common in longline fisheries, includingsea birds and sea turtles. There are sea bird mitigation measures being used by some longline fleets in the Indian Ocean, which appear to have been successful at reducing interactions. The Indian Ocean Tuna Commission has implemented management measures for sea bird and sea turtles{IOTC 2013}.However, additional research on mitigation measures is warranted and continued monitoring of current mitigation measures and their effectiveness is needed.

IOTC
Indonesia
Drifting longlines

Last updated on 27 February 2014

Observer records from tuna longline vessels indicated that only eight seabirds were observed incidentally captured. It is therefore likely that any seabird interactions in mahi mahi directed longline fisheries will also be low.Between 2012 and 2013 a total of 25 sea turtles (11 dead) were incidentally captured in observed tuna longline sets.Indonesia does not have a National Plan of Action in place for either sea birds or sea turtles {Satria et al. 2013}.

Other Species

Last updated on 14 December 2011

Sharks and other fish species are also captured in longline fisheries. Total bycatch levels for the Indian Ocean longline fishery have been estimated to be 6%. Interactions with sharks continue to be problematic in this region because several large fleets use wire instead of monofilament leaders (making it difficult for sharks to escape capture).Blue and shortfin mako sharks are the two most commonly captured shark species {Adrill et al. 2013}.The Indian Ocean Tuna Commission has implemented some shark specific regulations {IOTC 2013}.However, additional research on mitigation measures is warranted as are additional management measures, such as bycatch limits.

IOTC
Indonesia
Drifting longlines

Last updated on 28 February 2014

The two most commonly caught sharks species are blue and shortfin mako sharks. Indonesia has been implemented a National Plan of Action for Sharks and has recently been organizing workshops and seminars and producing information for distribution to fishermen concerning the importance of maintaining sustainable shark populations. In addition, a recent effort towards catch limits for some shark species has been made. However, the success of these measures does not yet appear to be significant.In addition to sharks, billfish make up about 6% of the total catch in tuna longline fisheries. These include: swordfish, shortbill spearfish, blue and black marlin, striped marlin, and sailfish {Satria et al. 2013}.

HABITAT

Last updated on 19 November 2012

Pelagic gears used to target Dolphinfish do not come in contact with sea floor and hence have nominal effects on the habitat.

IOTC
Indonesia
Drifting longlines

Last updated on 28 February 2014

Pelagic longlines do not typically come in contact with bottom habitats.

FishSource Scores

MANAGEMENT QUALITY

As calculated for 2014 data.

The score is < 6.

There are no management objectives for this population at the international (i.e. RFMO) level.

As calculated for 2014 data.

The score is < 6.

There is no set TAC for this fishery.

STOCK HEALTH:

As calculated for 2014 data.

The score is < 6.

The status of the population throughout the Indian Ocean remains unknown as no stock assessments have been conducted to date.

As calculated for 2014 data.

The score is < 6.

Estimates of current fishing mortality rates throughout the Indian Ocean have not been estimated from stock assessments.

No data available for biomass
No data available for biomass
No data available for catch and tac
No data available for catch and tac
No data available for fishing mortality
No data available for fishing mortality
No data available for recruitment
No data available for recruitment
To see data for management quality, please view this site on a desktop.
To see data for stock status, please view this site on a desktop.

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Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs)

SELECT FIP

Access FIP Public Report

Progress Rating: B
Evaluation Start Date: 11 Jul 2014
Type: Basic

Comments:

FIP rating is B. Basic FIP with stage 4 progress over the past 12 months.

 

1.
FIP Development
Jun 15
2.
FIP Launch
Jan 12
Jan 15
3.
FIP Implementation
Jun 18
4.
Improvements in Fishing Practices and Fishery Management
Jun 18
5.
Improvements on the Water
Verifiable improvement on the water
6.
MSC certification (optional)
MSC certificate made public

Certifications

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)

No related MSC certifications

Sources

Credits

Adrill, D., Itano, D. and Gillett, R. 2013. A review of bycatch and discard issues in Indian Ocean tuna fisheries.
Smartfish working Papers. Available at:http://www.iotc.org/files/proceedings/2012/wpeb/IOTC-2012-WPEB08-INF20.pdf

Benjamin, D., Kurup, M. 2012. Stock assessment of dolphinfish Coryphaena hippurus (Linnaeus, 1758) off southwest coast of India. Marine Biological Association of India doi:10.6024/jmbai.2012.54.1.01675-12. Available at http://mbai.org.in/uploads/manuscripts/article%20%2012.pdf

Collette, B., Acero, A., Amorim, A.F., Boustany, A., Canales Ramirez, C., Cardenas, G., Carpenter, K.E., de Oliveira Leite Jr., N., Di Natale, A., Fox, W., Fredou, F.L., Graves, J., Viera Hazin, F.H., Juan Jorda, M., Minte Vera, C., Miyabe, N., Montano Cruz, R., Nelson, R., Oxenford, H., Schaefer, K., Serra, R., Sun, C., Teixeira Lessa, R.P., Pires Ferreira Travassos, P.E., Uozumi, Y. & Yanez, E. 2011. Coryphaena hippurus. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/154712/0

IOTC. 2013. Compendium of active and pending conservation and management measures for the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission. September 15, 2013. Available at: http://www.iotc.org/files/CMM/IOTC%20-%20Compendium%20of%20ACTIVE%20CMMs%2015%20September%202013.pdf

  1. Díaz-Jaimes, P., Uribe-Alcocer, M., Rocha-Olivares, A., García-de-León, F.J., Nortmoon, P., Durand, J.D., 2010. Global phylogeography of the dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus): The influence of large effective population size and recent dispersal on the divergence of a marine pelagic cosmopolitan species, Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 57: 1209–1218ftp://ftp.cicese.mx/pub/divOC/ocebiol/Axa_Rocha_NO_BORRAR/Lab%20papers%20PDF/2010_MPE_57%283%29.pdf
  1. Gillett, R. 2011. The promotion of pole-and-line tuna fishing in the Pacific Islands: Emerging issues and lessons learned. ISSF Technical Report 2011-08. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, McLean, Virginia, USAhttp://iss-foundation.org/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2011/10/ISSF-2011-08-PoleLine-Issues-and-Lessons.pdf
References

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    Common dolphinfish - Indian Ocean, IOTC, Indonesia, Drifting longlines

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